Sunday, 13 January 2019

Requiem for a Dolphin

Dolphins are social animals, living in pods and engaging in what seems to be fairly sophisticated communication. It's likely that such behaviour is part of the reason for their success, with well over 30 species spread across the world's oceans... and that's excluding porpoises, and some other "dolphin-like" animals outside the dolphin family proper.

Sociability involves a number of different traits and behaviours, but one that's known to exist in cetaceans and relatively little else, other than primates, is what's technically known as epimeletic behaviour. This is, in essence, the act of helping other members of your species when they are in trouble, typically due to an injury of some kind. (For what it's worth, this compares with etepimeletic behaviour, which is acting in such a way as to make it easier for others to care for you).

Sunday, 6 January 2019

Gerbil versus Rattlesnake

Sidewinder
Deserts are harsh environments, and living in them poses animals a number of problems, not least of which are daytime heat and an absence of water. In order to survive in such a place, animals need to evolve suitable adaptations - extremely efficient kidneys to reduce water loss are one such example.

But the thing about deserts is that, while there are some geographic differences between them, the challenges of living in one are at least broadly similar regardless of which desert it happens to be. And while, say, the world's seas are all connected, the deserts aren't. So animals, including mammals, have had to evolve means of surviving in them several times over, re-developing the necessary features each time they encounter a new one.